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In March, the National Education Association released its latest Rankings and Estimates report. Last school year, North Carolina's average teacher salary ranked 42nd in the nation and trailed No. 41-ranked Louisiana by just over $100. The new edition of the report should be...
Democrats like Roy Cooper and the rest of the 'sky-is-falling' crowd on the left are once again peddling false information and statistics in an attempt to mislead North Carolinians on education and teacher pay. While they say that teachers are leaving NC, the fact is that North Carolina is...
Governor Pat McCrory spoke with teachers from throughout the state today for a meeting of his Teacher Advisory Committee, a committee re-established in September 2013 to address the needs of North Carolina K-12 teachers and students.
The taxpayers of North Carolina have historically made a tremendous commitment to education, and the next biennium will continue that legacy. More than 54 percent, or over $12 billion of our General Fund spending will be directed to education in each year of the biennium.
Accomplishments: High School graduation rates are at an all-time high. North Carolina's 2014 graduation rate of 83.9 percent is the highest recorded in the state's history...
Over the last few weeks, debates in the North Carolina legislature have focused on the budget and the stark differences between the House and Senate versions. This week I would like to discuss more of the politics of the budget process and what that means for spending measures.
Gov. Pat McCrory called on lawmakers to honor a promise to increase starting teacher salaries to $35,000 and included salary boosts for state troopers and corrections officers Thursday as he unveiled his $21.5 billion General Fund budget for the 2015-16 fiscal year.
Gov. Pat McCrory called on lawmakers to honor a promise to increase starting teacher salaries to $35,000 and included salary boosts for state troopers and corrections officers Thursday as he unveiled his $21.5 billion General Fund budget for the 2015-16 fiscal year.
Governor Pat McCrory spoke with teachers from throughout the state today for a meeting of his Teacher Advisory Committee, a committee re-established in September 2013 to address the needs of North Carolina K-12 teachers and students.
Gov. Pat McCrory called on lawmakers to honor a promise to increase starting teacher salaries to $35,000 and included salary boosts for state troopers and corrections officers Thursday as he unveiled his $21.5 billion General Fund budget for the 2015-16 fiscal year.
Governor McCrory, Lt. Governor Forest, Senate Pro Tem Berger, and Speaker Tillis announce teacher pay increases in North Carolina.
This week Gov. McCrory, Lt. Gov. Forest, House Speaker Tillis, and I announced our plan to make North Carolina's starting teacher salaries among the highest in the Southeast.
Governor Pat McCrory announced a sweeping array of education initiatives that will increase teacher pay, provide in-state tuition for newly separated veterans, increase funding for textbooks and establish salary supplements for teachers who obtain advanced degrees in a subject they are teaching.
Teacher and state employee pay raises, increased environmental protection and continued operational reforms are given high priority in Governor Pat McCrory's short session recommended budget.
Gov. Pat McCrory's budget calls for teachers and state employees to get raises, the environmental police to add 19 positions to monitor coal ash, and budget authors to keep the state's spending plan structurally sound.
Senate budget negotiators will meet Wednesday morning in a public "conference committee" meeting to start ironing out differences between three fiscal plans: one proposed by Gov. Pat McCrory and two passed by each legislative chamber. The question is whether House conferees will take part.
Tom Campbell, of NC Spin recently suggest that "Let's take teacher pay off the table." No he was not suggesting that the issue of teacher pay be ignored, but quite the opposite...that it be "settled" once and for all.
Just when we might be ready to engage in productive discussions about creating world-class schools in North Carolina another distraction arises. Drop-out rates, common core, testing, charter schools, vouchers....all no doubt worthy of some discussion.
Our lawmakers have been embroiled in contentious debates about teacher pay and Medicaid, among other issues, as they struggle to revise our $21 billion state budget.
A survey of nearly 900 academic studies from the past quarter-century shows North Carolina has been moving in the right direction on education reform in recent years. That's a key conclusion from a new John Locke Foundation Spotlight report.
"Logrolling" is a budgeting technique whereby each chamber negotiates with the other for inclusion of specific line items in the final spending plan.
I have been discussing teacher pay rankings for years. In fact, three years ago I wrote a newsletter piece titled, Education spending in North Carolina: The ranking problem. In that piece, I outlined the major problems associated with the National Education Association (NEA) rankings of teacher...
It has been said, "No man's life, liberty or property are safe while the Legislature is in session." That should be the guiding principle for all legislative sessions: convene, get the work done and go home. I think 2014's short session of the North Carolina General Assembly will be quick and to...
Senate Budget Plan Includes Largest Teacher Pay Raise in State History North Carolina's state Senate last night released its proposed changes to the second year of the 2013-15 biennial budget.
North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory yesterday unveiled his recommended budget adjustments for the 2014-15 fiscal year. The governor's plan would make changes to the second year of the two-year state budget plan passed last year.
As the North Carolina Association of Educators (NCAE) holds its "School's Out" rally, the Civitas Institute puts the spotlight on the gulf between teacher's salaries and NCAE executives' salaries.
News accounts of the recently-passed $21.1 billion General Fund budget focus primarily on the teacher pay raise provided by budget writers.
This article is Part I of a two-part series examining how North Carolina's public school system pays its teachers.
Do other professions require their "best" employees to give up an accomplishment to get a raise?
The latest Civitas Poll suggests strong public support for a new state law that requires local school systems to end tenure.
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