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Over the last few weeks, the Raleigh News and Observer (along with its sister outlet, the Charlotte Observer) has been waging war on the opponents of Common Core and in particular on the Academic Standards Review Commission, the body tasked with reviewing the math and English standards and...
The News & Observer is doing its darnedest to ignore the growing criticism of Common Core standards. The paper's recent editorial "Defending Common Core" was an exercise in putting lipstick on a pig.
On the front page of the November 28th edition of the Raleigh News and Observer the paper featured a report by Justin Catanoso, a Wake forest University journalism professor. The author expressed optimism that the Paris global warming conference would produce a "binding agreement to burn less...
In 1972, at the University of Georgia, our college newspaper staff opposed the proposal to change the name of the Henry W. Grady School of Journalism to the Henry W. Grady School of Mass Communications
Governor Pat McCrory has ordered state agencies to prepare for possible flooding ahead of a variety of weather systems, including Hurricane Joaquin, and is urging all North Carolinians to do the same.
The North Carolina Republican Party today delivered in-kind campaign contribution forms to the Raleigh News & Observer after its editorial board endorsed Attorney General Roy Cooper in a bizarre editorial over the weekend. Remarkably, the paper's endorsement came before Cooper answered a single...
Governor Pat McCrory issued the following statement after learning of the death of pioneer television newsman, Doug Mayes.
Political discussion often involves debate over competing ideas. But some partisans want no debate. They would rather declare certain views off-limits. It's a tactic that disturbs Guy Benson and Mary Katharine Ham, co-authors of the book End of Discussion: How the Left's Outrage Industry Shuts...
This administration is a champion of transparency and fair and legitimate news gathering. Fulfilling records requests is vital part of meeting those goals.
No matter how good the crystal ball, it is impossible to predict what will happen in 2015. Perhaps it will be easier to identify the people likely to either make or respond to North Carolina news events.
I am not sure if Journalism was better then or now but sometimes you wonder if anyone checked the facts before print. These cause no harm and maybe required less scrutiny.
I enjoy debating with my teenage granddaughter. She made the statement that things are better now and I stated that I could say times were better because I am 70 years old and know the news now and also then. She knows only now.
I can make decisions about social change by reading current and old newspapers.
By now, most of us have come to expect the left-wing bias of the Raleigh News & Observer.
Reporter Lynn Bonner and the News and Observer showed us once again why people have stopped buying newspapers: Reporters keep trying to make the news, not report it.
Wake County Public Schools finds itself in the middle of a book controversy. Concerned parents at Highcroft Drive Elementary School have voiced concerns about the use of highly questionable books by fourth graders at the school. A blogger named NC Citizen, who wishes to remain anonymous, wrote...
"Do you have any interest in reporting the facts?" That's the question I'd like to ask News & Observer editors after reading the recent editorial, "Time for Wake Schools to Build Back."
I've been writing about media bias for 20-plus years, since that day in the early '90s when the scales fell from my eyes and I saw what was happening in my chosen profession. I was managing editor of The Herald-Sun in Durham, and I began seeing things I didn't like, not only in the national media, b
Many have made the observation that the greatest power the media has is its power to decide not to report something.
Newspapers never have been hesitant to shame a public official into appropriate behavior. It's a time-honored tradition. Have you ever noticed things like "Sen. Blowhard did not return a phone call," or "Rep. Self-Dealer did not answer an email" in news stories? Those are there not just to let...
Freedom of speech is one of the core values of a free society. It ought to be appreciated and protected by Americans across the political spectrum. Unfortunately, it is not.
Howard Mortman, C-SPAN communications director, pleasantly strolled me down Memory Lane during his recent lecture at William Peace University concerning the rise of social media. Then he slapped me back into a present and petrifying reality. More about that downpage.
Economist and syndicated columnist Thomas Sowell - a North Carolina native, by the way - is fond of denying that there are permanent solutions to problems. Instead, he insists, "there are only tradeoffs."
There's nothing more revealing about a news medium than the way it deals with its own errors. Is it, to use human terms, honest, forthright, and sincerely sorry, or is it evasive, sneaky, and dishonest?
In recent years, teacher shortages, along with high attrition rates in rural areas and in fields such as secondary math and science, have prompted state officials to look to the UNC system for more teachers.
Thank you for reading this column. It's not just that I appreciate your interest in what I have to say. I appreciate the fact that you are reading this publication at all. According to a recent set of surveys by the Pew Research Center, a distressing number of our fellow citizens rely mostly on...
It's not unusual for the media to be unintentionally insensitive. Sometimes in the rush of a deadline we write a headline or put something in a story that has effects we never predicted or anticipated.
I've been writing about media bias for 20-plus years, since that day in the early '90s when the scales fell from my eyes and I saw what was happening in my chosen profession. I was managing editor of The Herald-Sun in Durham, and I began seeing things I didn't like, not only in the national media, b
Many have made the observation that the greatest power the media has is its power to decide not to report something.
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