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Legislators involved with the certificate-of-need debate are probably overwhelmed with conflicting studies on whether the regulatory program should stay, be reduced, or go altogether.
It is easy to understand why North Carolina hospitals are adamant about keeping the state's Certificate of Need (CON) regulations locked in the law books. After all, what law better protects their fortresses from potential competitors who could possibly provide more innovative services in less...
Last week, the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce sponsored a health care breakfast panel where three North Carolina hospital CEOs talked about how competition brings out the best in their health systems. Competition is healthy. Competition is a beautiful thing.
It's been a little over one week since the House filed HB 200, which would loosen up the state's Certificate of Need (CON) law - a regulatory burden requiring medical providers to ask permission from the state and their competitors before expanding their businesses.
It is easy to understand why North Carolina hospitals are adamant about keeping the state's certificate-of-need regulations locked in the law books.
Hoping to loosen the monopoly hospitals have on a variety of medical procedures and facilities, State Rep. Marilyn Avila, R-Wake, has introduced House Bill 200, a measure repealing portions of the state certificate-of-need regulatory statutes.
North Carolina hospitals argue that dismantling regulations in the state's certificate of need laws would impair their ability to treat indigent patients. A research scholar at George Mason University's Mercatus Center says empirical studies conclude such dire warnings are little more than a...
It is easy to understand why North Carolina hospitals are adamant about keeping the state's certificate-of-need regulations locked in the law books.
Hoping to loosen the monopoly hospitals have on a variety of medical procedures and facilities, State Rep. Marilyn Avila, R-Wake, has introduced House Bill 200, a measure repealing portions of the state certificate-of-need regulatory statutes.
North Carolina hospitals argue that dismantling regulations in the state's certificate of need laws would impair their ability to treat indigent patients. A research scholar at George Mason University's Mercatus Center says empirical studies conclude such dire warnings are little more than a...
Hoping to loosen the monopoly hospitals have on a variety of medical procedures and facilities, State Rep. Marilyn Avila, R-Wake, has introduced House Bill 200, a measure repealing portions of the state certificate-of-need regulatory statutes.
North Carolina hospitals argue that dismantling regulations in the state's certificate of need laws would impair their ability to treat indigent patients. A research scholar at George Mason University's Mercatus Center says empirical studies conclude such dire warnings are little more than a...
Taxpayers and patients unnecessarily pay hundreds of millions of dollars in medical costs because of arcane regulations, turf-protective hospitals, and a state regulatory agency that opposes reforms, say physicians seeking legislative relief to open more doctor-owned same-day surgery and...
Medicaid takes a serious bite out of North Carolina's budget. Of the General Fund's $5 billion allocated to the Department of Health and Human Services, Medicaid devours a solid $3 billion. But if we step back and account for Medicaid's total cost - state and federal funds combined - tax...
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